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  • Nancy Radke

Games: The Tower of Babel plus 1 More Teaching Game

Updated: Apr 24, 2018

TOWER OF BABEL (Kids love this game)

Make sure you read the blog about using the question box before playing any games.

You need wooden blocks for this game. I love to play it with large blocks, made from 2 X 4s, cut to around 8 inches long (2 x 4 x 8), which gives you three different ways to stack the blocks. One of our parents made blocks for our classes.


Play this on a hard surface, like a wooden floor or a hard table. It helps the blocks balance, and it makes the noise louder when the tower falls. Have 1-2 students per tower. If you have lots of questions, have them stack the blocks sideways. For a few questions, stack them end to end. (Or just keep playing, building new towers.)


IMPORTANT:

  1. For each correct answer, they must put ONE block on their tower.

  2. For each incorrect answer, they must put TWO blocks on their tower.

  3. Game ends when a tower topples.

  4. Highest tower left standing wins.

(If needed, add a block each time a student misbehaves. In this game, you do not want blocks added to your tower.) With one child, you (teacher) build a tower at the same time they build theirs. Very young children can stack their blocks on edge, while older ones put theirs end to end. Kids love the noise when a tower falls, and a swaying tower is very dramatic!

CLEAN THE TEETH: Game for Memory Verse or Math Reviews


(Memory Verses, Math Questions) On the blackboard draw a face with large teeth showing. One tooth per child. Or, one face for each child. Each student is asked to say his memory verse. If correct, the student cleans "his" tooth with chalk so that the tooth is white. Incorrect answers stay dark.


If you use a whiteboard, start with dark teeth and the student may erase the color. A dragon provides lots of teeth for a math-fact review; a buck-toothed rabbit has two, or just one, for a memory verse review.


I had a student become very upset when his face didn’t have clean teeth! He really started to work on learning his memory verse after that. (Got this idea from an unknown source, years ago.)

The funnier the face, the more fun it is to say a memory verse.